Strawberry Lemonade

We’ve all heard the old adage: “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” And while the idea of turning something sour into something sweet is a great lesson, what happens when life gives you more than lemons? What if it gives you, say, strawberries? Lots and lots of strawberries? Because — let’s face it — seldom do we get only bad news. More often than not, life doles out lemons and strawberries in equal abundance (though, seasonally, not always at the same time). The trick is not to focus on each exclusively, but to look at them together.

This is a recipe that balances the tart with the sweet — a great example of how refreshingly complex things can be if you open yourself up to the possibilities of what is in front of you. June’s own little example of yin and yang. Strawberry Lemonade.

A cool, refreshing glass of strawberry lemonade

A cool, refreshing glass of strawberry lemonade

Shop with us at Stults’ Farm and learn how to make your own Strawberry Lemonade – keep reading to find out more.

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Grilled Lemon Garlic Chicken Breasts

The Memorial Day weekend in the United States is the unofficial start of summer. It’s also the weekend that grills across the nation — having lain dormant under feet of winter snow — get dusted off, cleaned out and fired up. If you’re on the hunt for an easy grilling recipe that is both adult and kid-friendly, raises the bar over traditional hamburger and hot dog fare, and takes no more than five minutes to cook once it hits the flame, this is the recipe for you.

Marinating meat does several things to it by adding flavor and tenderizing the meat fibers. But be careful: not all marinades are created equal. Here are some of the things we’ve learned along the way that you’ll need to be aware of when marinating meat (check out the subscription site Cook’s Illustrated for great scientific explanations of what happens during the marinating process):

  • Acids: break apart the meat and collagen fibers on the meat surface which allows it to better retain moisture. But if you use too much acid in a marinade, or marinate the meat for too long in an acidic marinade, the meat will become mushy as the meat fibers break even further apart.
  • Oil: carries oil-soluable flavors and coats the surface meat fibers in the flavoring agent (in this case, lemon and garlic).
  • Salt/high-sodium ingredients: add flavor, but also work as a brining agent to pull moisture from the marinade into the meat.
  • Flavoring agents like garlic and herbs: once the acids and salts have worked their magic on the meat and collagen fibers, these flavors combine with the oil to penetrate the outermost surface of the meat and add complex and complementary tastes.

This particular recipe uses highly-acidic lemon juice in combination with salt to quickly tenderize and brine the outer surface of some thinly-cut chicken breasts. The olive oil and garlic, in combination with the citrus flavor of the lemon juice, then works its way into the chicken. These chicken breasts are very tender and flavorful as a result, the perfect complement to a Memorial Day spread.

A great recipe for grilling season: lemon garlic chicken breasts

A great recipe for grilling season: lemon garlic chicken breasts

Keep reading for our easy Grilled Lemon Garlic Chicken Breast recipe!

Kale Salad with Roasted Red Peppers, Raisins and Toasted Walnuts

I’m going to start this post with an endorsement: a six-year-old I know had two servings of this salad at a birthday party this weekend and it was the first thing he asked for at lunch the next day. If that doesn’t get you to try it, I don’t know what will!

While this dish recently joined others as part of a birthday party buffet, it is really more like Christmas in a bowl — only three months ahead of schedule. All green and red, you can’t help but dig in. And when you do, the flavors are both intense and inviting. Crunchy kale, tangy red peppers, sweet raisins, earthy walnuts, and a tart lemon/shallot/garlic dressing tying it all together. And did I mention this, too, is vegetarian and vegan? Bonus!

Feeding a birthday crowd

Feeding a birthday crowd

I sadly have to fess up and admit that, for the longest time, raw kale held little interest for me. My husband and I are big salad eaters but I’d continually pass on the kale at the farmer’s market. Or, when we had it as part of our farm share basket, I’d put it into a soup. Fairly often, I’d freeze it for some future use…which actually meant it went into cold storage until the day I could bring myself to throw it away, all freezer-burned and inedible.

And then….

It must have been another festivity years ago. The time my husband and I celebrated his birthday at Blue Hill at Stone Barn, Chef Dan Barber’s now-iconic farm-to-table restaurant in Pocantico Hills, New York. We hadn’t yet been exposed to the growing buzz around Chef Barber’s fresh cooking philosophy. After touring the farm and then making our way through his multi-course tasting menu we were converts. And while I can’t quite remember if kale was on any of the many plates that evening (it almost certainly must have been!), what I do know is that, suddenly, I couldn’t open a magazine or read a newspaper without seeing Dan Barber’s name. And somewhere along the way, I came across his recipe for Kale Salad with Pine Nuts and Parmesan. It was all over. Raw kale was on the menu at home, too, and I’ve been having fun experimenting with seasonal ingredients and tastes to really bring out the benefits of this overlooked vegetable.

Like Christmas on a plate

Like Christmas on a plate

So, be it a birthday, a holiday, or just another night packed with soccer practice or piano lessons…give this one a try. You’ll be celebrating, too.

Kale Salad with Roasted Red Peppers, Raisins and Toasted Walnuts

Ingredients:
2 large bunches of kale (preferably curly kale), well washed with ribs removed
12 to 14 ounces roasted red peppers
1 cup raisins
1 cup walnuts, lightly toasted in a pan on the stove top and broken into small pieces (not too small though)
1 lemon, juiced
6 tablespoons olive oil
1 small shallot, finely diced
2 garlic cloves, finely diced
Kosher salt and freshly-ground black pepper

Lay out the kale leaves on a cutting board, stacking one on top of the other, and slice them into thin ribbons across the grain. Put the kale into a large bowl.

Kale, salad-bound

Kale, salad-bound

After removing any remaining seeds from the peppers, cut them into then ribbons as well, and then slice further so that each piece is approximately 1/4 inch x 1 inch (don’t worry too much about the size…you just want small pieces that integrate into the salad). Place sliced peppers into the bowl with the kale.

To plump the raisins, reconstitute them by placing them in a microwave-proof bowl or measuring cup with water to cover, and then microwaving on high for 1 minute. Raisins will be nice and soft. Drain them, and add the raisins to the salad.

Add the walnuts after they’ve been toasted. Be careful not to burn them while toasting.

To make the dressing, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, shallot, garlic cloves, a generous pinch of salt and several grinds of black pepper until well combined (this is a riff on a Jamie Oliver recipe for jam jar dressings – worth having these at your fingertips). Pour the dressing over the salad and work everything together with your (clean!) hands until the kale is well coated and the red peppers, raisins and walnuts are well-distributed.

The kale salad, being assembled

The kale salad, being assembled

Allow the salad to sit in the refrigerator for approximately one hour before serving. The lemon juice will begin to soften the kale leaves and make them more tender, and the flavors will really develop.

Serves: 10 – 15 as a side dish. To serve a smaller party, halve the recipe.

It’s worth noting that we’ve done variations on this salad with great results. A close friend of ours doesn’t care for roasted red peppers or walnuts, so I made a version with oven-roasted tomatoes and toasted pine nuts and it turned out nicely too! I shaved some Locatelli cheese into that version, which made it a pretty close cousin to the version Dan Barber makes.

Parent rating: The hostess at the birthday party gave me a report of “four stars” from the adults. And she really is the hostess with the mostess…so to even have a dish on the table with some of her wonderful creations is an honor!
Kid rating: I’m going out on a limb and giving this four kid stars based on the endorsement from the afore-mentioned six-year-old. Sadly, our girls would NOT try this. Perhaps kale really is an acquired taste…and a six-year-old palate is so much more sophisticated than a five-year-old one!

Cucumber and Lemon Zest Tea Sandwiches

Let’s face it. Sick days are no fun. Especially when you’re three, and at home with a tummy ache.

Daughter 2 may have preferred following me around today to being at daycare, but sick is sick. She’s usually a good eater but I could tell nothing sounded good today. So when, after nap, she asked if we could have a little tea party I wholeheartedly endorsed the idea. Tea sandwiches (a sneaky way of getting food into the child) and a little watered-down orange juice were just the ticket.

Can we have a tea party? Can we?

Can we have a tea party? Can we?

We kept it simple but added a lemony twist. “I love lemon!” she told me as we made these.

Sick or not, our cucumber and lemon zest tea sandwiches are just the thing for a quick pick-me-up. And when made with a garden cucumber that has chilled in the refrigerator they really do taste like summer!

Assembling our sandwiches

Assembling our sandwiches

Serve on their own, or with some other quick sweet and savory goodies for a real tea party tower of treats.

Cucumber and Lemon Zest Tea Sandwiches

Ingredients:
8 slices sandwich bread, crusts removed if you wish
2 – 3 tablespoons salted butter
Zest from 1 large lemon
1 cucumber, peeled and thinly sliced
Salt

Spread a thin coating of butter on one side of each bread slice. Zest the lemon over 4 bread slices so the zest is evenly distributed among the 4 slices. Arrange the cumber slices evenly among the other 4 bread slices and sprinkle with salt to taste. Pair one lemon-zest bread slice with a cumber-covered bread slice to make a sandwich. Cut diagonally to make 2 triangles, and then cut those triangles diagonally again so that each sandwich ends up in 4 triangles. (Hey — you can cut yours any way you’d like…squares, rectangles, or leave ’em whole!)

So summery

So summery

The real art is in the presentation. Daughter 2 asked for them on a pretty platter we use for tea parties and I was more than happy to oblige.

Serves: 4

A platter of cucumber and lemon zest tea sandwiches

A platter of cucumber and lemon zest tea sandwiches

Kid rating: four stars. The first bites were heaven, for daughter 2 and for me. But in the end her lack of appetite won out and she only ended up eating about half a sandwich. Daughter 1 will likely be jealous when she gets home though!
Parent rating: four stars. My idea of tea party fare leans toward smoked salmon (which would have been FANTASTIC on these, with a little dill!) or curried chicken. But these were just so fresh, and nibble-able, that I kind of wished we had reasons for tea parties more often.

Zucchini Carpaccio Salad With Lemon-Olive Oil Dressing

This was one of those shot-in-the-dark dishes that, through the miracle of presentation and some phenomena that must have included the stars and moon aligning, made it past the lips of BOTH daughter 1 and daughter 2 (who asked for seconds!) and left me, frankly, both surprised and giddily smug.

The definition of a seasonal vegetable here in the Northeast, zucchini are ridiculously prolific for two short months before retreating to greenhouses and other warmer climes. They are wonderful when harvested small — a pound at the most — and are tender with a pleasingly bitter finish.

Sautéed, fried, stuffed and baked, in a bread or gratin or strata…nearly all preparations call for baking a zucchini, and they can all be lovely. But there is one presentation that, I think, really allows the zucchini to shine for what it is, and that is thinly sliced and raw, with a simple dressing and even simpler adornments. A carpaccio.

It is here that I must pause and share that, despite the tasting rule, daughter 1 VASTLY prefers cooked veggies to raw. Other kids gobble up crisp carrot sticks. Not her, but dump them in a pot of boiling water and she’s a happy camper. This week alone I had to toss two Zip-Lock bags of fresh carrots and cucumbers that came home, uneaten, from school lunch.

So I wasn’t holding out hope when I served raw zucchini. Cooked zucchini rarely gets a second look, so why would its ugly step-sister the zucchini salad get invited to the ball? Why indeed. But this dish, like Cinderella, will get invited to the palace for keeps. Give it a try: it might be your Cinderella dish too, and who couldn’t use a little happily ever after these days?

Imagine this salad on your summer table

Imagine this salad on your summer table

Ingredients:
1 small to medium zucchini (approximately 1 pound)
Salt
1/2 lemon, juiced
2 tablespoons olive oil
Pepper
4 tablespoons basil, thinly sliced in a chiffonade
Approximately 1 ounce of Parmigiano Reggiano, shaved from a wedge of cheese using a vegetable peeler

Start by thinly slicing the zucchini — I used an inexpensive mandolin that makes even slices quite quickly. Liberally salt the zucchini slices and place them in a colander to release a little moisture. After about 30 minutes rinse the zucchini, pat dry with a clean tea towel, and arrange overlapping slices on a serving platter.

Make the dressing by combining the lemon juice, olive oil and pepper into an emulsion and pour over the zucchini. Top with the cheese shavings and sprinkle the basil chiffonade over the finished dish.

Really, it’s that simple.

For variety you could add some toasted pine nuts or walnuts — two of my go-to salad additions — for crunch, or try a different cheese (I think a mild blue would work nicely with the zucchini).

Serves: 4 – 6

Parent rating: five stars. This is such a nice balance of flavors if properly dressed and so easy to make with ingredients that are fresh and abundant this time of year. I was thrilled the girls enjoyed it too.
Kid rating: four stars. Daughter 2 had two helpings and daughter 1 managed to eat three zucchini slices, which is more zucchini than I think she’s ever eaten, zucchini bread included. I think the cheese helped, but she even told me the next day that she liked the dish. We’ll try it again soon with more zucchini from the CSA.